Haiku – ‘Spill Challenge

 

A traditional Japanese Haiku is a seventeen-syllable poem of three lines, five syllables/ seven syllables/ five syllables. It usually evokes nature in some way, for example the changing seasons. The art of haiku began in 9th-12th century Japan in the form of a Tanka, which was a progressive poem. The first person would write the beginning with a 5/7/5 structure; the next would add to it with a 7/7 structure. You can read more at: 
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-haiku-poems.html#OhIg6h8oltKYXB4D.99

Anyway, I thought it might make an amusing ‘Spill challenge if I started off with a 5/7/5 verse, and you lot carried it on – if you can keep to the 5/7/5 – 7/7 – 5/7/5 – 7/7 etc.  structure, that would be great, but if not just have a go anyway – you don’t have to stick with nature, you could have music, art, sausages … anything you like, funny, poignant, surreal …  and for extra ‘Spill points, if you can think of a song written in, or about haiku, that would be grand. Here’s your starter:

Bloggers turn poets / Like unexpected snowfall / Shimmering and bright

 

24 thoughts on “Haiku – ‘Spill Challenge

  1. Robert Hunter loves haiku, although he rarely does the proper 5/7/5 format:

    Ripple in still water
    When there is no pebble tossed
    Nor wind to blow

    Your rain falls like crazy fingers
    Peals of fragile thunder
    Keeping time

    Cloud hands reaching from a rainbow
    Tapping at the window
    Touch your hair

    • I’m attempting to write a biography of a friend who writes in sonnets … except that some of them have 15 lines … he was unperturbed by this when I mentioned it, so I’m sure it doesn’t matter! Similarly, Robert Hunter’s words are what counts, rather than precise form.

    • I’ve only just had time to give this a proper listen and to read up on it, there’s such a lot packed into it, perfectly summarised in your haiku. Was Wilson influenced by Rupert Brooke, as well, or am I missing the point? (My parents liked Rupert Brooke, they had identical volumes of poetry by him – quite romantic in a way, although I can’t imagine either of them with a romantic streak!)

    • Well knock me down with a feather. So much music out there that needs exploring. I think you get an extra ‘Spill point for that (although you haven’t actually extended the haiku!!)

  2. I may have got this wrong but it sounds like this “Tanka” thing goes 5-7-5, 7-7, 5-7-5, 7-7 etc.
    So I’ve added a couple of seven sevens to join up the lines that Ali, Carole and Chris have posted. I wasn’t sure if Beth’s poetic comment on her link was meant to be part of any collaboration so I didn’t include it but that’s not written in stone. Or snow…

    Anyway what we now have so far is:

    Bloggers turn poets / Like unexpected snowfall / Shimmering and bright
    Brighter than a thousand suns / Caught in the cold light of day
    Excited but cool/ Because you have to stay hip/And go with the trip
    Skating on icy pathways / Slipping and sliding until
    Scattered thoughts take shape/ Moulded like a man of snow/ Into fleeting sense
    Look how our songs are fashioned/ Hear how our songs paint the world

    which means we have to have a 5-7-5 next and so on….

    (or not)

  3. Here’s my attempt at incorporating Beth’s and Aba’s:

    Bloggers turn poets / Like unexpected snowfall / Shimmering and bright
    Brighter than a thousand suns / Caught in the cold light of day
    Excited but cool/ Because you have to stay hip/ And go with the trip
    Skating on icy pathways / Slipping and sliding until
    Scattered thoughts take shape/ Moulded like a man of snow / Into fleeting sense
    Look how our songs are fashioned / Hear how our songs paint the world
    Haiku Salut and / Public Service Broadcasting / Collaborating!
    Each song unique echoing / Poems, landscape, ancestry
    A poem in song / Brooke by WIlson by Reynolds / Last line makes me cry.

    • Clever!
      The one I used to have as my screen saver at work (not written by me) was:
      “Windows NT crashed.
      I am the Blue Screen of Death.
      No one hears your screams.”
      (Quite apt at the time).

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