Saturday Shuffle

I thought I’d start a new thing in my usual slot. This is not hugely dissimilar to WOYT. I’m going to hit shuffle on my player of choice and see which three tracks come up next. I’ll post them here as tracks and pop them into the box too. It would be lovely to hear what you think (about this new idea and the music).

Oddly, the 3 tracks that came up first are all from compilations.

I do believe I may have nominated the first song for an RR theme on cheating – it had already been zedded some time before, but it does what it says on the tin etc.

Jackie Mittoo popped up 2nd. One of a couple of excellent Studio One compilations we have of his lovely keyboard sounds. Keyboard King of Studio One is probably a stronger collection but this track does very nicely.

The Best of David Bowie: 1969 – 1974 is a 20 track collection I borrowed from my friend Dr Rob and promptly ripped it. I have just 6 Bowie albums in total; this is the only collection though and is full of hits. This is a brief song about a short-lived affair that makes him miserable. All we know about the girl is, she has long blonde hair and is more than likely the Devil’s daughter. The opening reminds me of something by Badly Drawn Boy and the jaunty sax and strings make this a cute song of heartbreak.

What comes up when you hit shuffle?

Instrumentals 2017

On the occasions I’ve done RR this year, I’ve produced an instrumental playlist to go alongside the A & B lists.  I’ve been collecting instrumental tracks from this year and thought I’d share it here in the same vein.  There are only a couple that contain some lyrical content – but it’s marginal.  I couldn’t find all the tracks on YouTube (but the full list is intact on Spotify), so I’ve had to skip some or swap them for something else by the same artist.

What else have I missed?

Tin Man – Sarah Winman

I can’t imagine any of you are that bothered, but in case you want to read something while waiting for the Festive ‘Spil Ones, or if you are thinking of a last minute book gift to buy tomorrow, I’ve just written my first post since February over at my own place.  Here it is:

A Fiction Habit

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This time last year, I suggested we talk about love.  Shall we do it again?  I think we should.

This year has seen even less writing here than last year.  Despite the lack of new “content” I got lots of visitors (that story’s for another time).  Although I’ve not been active here, I’ve been writing bits elsewhere and short pieces for work.  My year’s been hectic beyond belief with nothing more than everyday life and surviving it, which has inevitably impacted my reading choices.  In the main, I’ve chosen slim volumes this year; brevity has been everything.

Writers have to work hard with short fiction (I’m not suggesting that writers of longer fiction don’t work hard btw).  I continue to marvel at how writers use style and language to convey a story in a short volume.  What they leave out tends to be almost as important as the words…

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The Wheel of Your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number. The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album. This week’s spin landed on I6.

The track I’ve chosen is 1049 Gotho by Bristol band Idles. Idles have grown their following this year probably due to being picked up by BBC Introducing. Before that, I saw a writer I follow on Twitter talking about their visceral and energetic delivery. The name of their album, Brutalism, suggested a rawness, bleakness and modernity – I pictured the buildings of Park Hill estate in Sheffield where my husband was at university; a blot on the landscape and beautifully post modern all at once. I had to give it a listen. So on a journey into town at the end of March, I put it on at full volume and enjoyed the assault on my eardrums. “Commute noise” I called it.

Visceral is a good descriptions. The undercurrent of their pulsating bass/drums combo paired with the singer’s close-to-the-mic shouty delivery, almost spitting the lyrics out, makes it a physical listen. It’s a breeze-block of an album; sturdy and rough. Yet there is genuine warmth and humour in the lyrics. The stream of consciousness song writing style suggests depth of thought and honesty. I love them like I love Savages and Sleaford Mods. Their observational contempt is refreshing and their noise sonically and accurately articulates my on/off frustration with life.

My son and I saw them on a beautiful summer’s evening this year, just as the sun was setting at a very tame, small festival local to me. The crowd was tiny and mostly made up of a hardcore of travelling fans all kitted out in Idles awesome merch. And what absolutely lovely fellas they were too. It was a lovely moment, just me and my boy.

Anyway, enough of my blather. I really like this album. You wouldn’t put it on if you had family round for Sunday lunch there are plenty of other opportunities though. Another one to listen to through headphones or on a decent stereo.

I’d love to hear what you think of Idles.

What’s your I6?

The Wheel of Your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number. The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album. This week’s spin landed on W4.

The artist I’ve chosen is Jane Weaver. She and I have something in common; we were born in the same year. That’s pretty much where the similarity ends! She’s been around and creating music for a long time. I’ve only come across her this year although undoubtedly I have probably heard stuff over the years either by her or that she collaborated on. Her 2017 10 track album Modern Kosmology is a a heady mix of melodic, electronic, fluff and fuss free songs that wheedle into your brain and become little earworms. There’s a home made feel to some of them; I love that shunning-big-production sound. There’s not one track on the album I don’t like. Track 4 is called Slow Motion. Listening to it via YouTube on your laptop does this song no credit. Whack it up in the car, or on the train, or on the bus – the beat has a chug chug* (sorry!) motion to it making it a good travelling song. It’s got a lovely dreamlike quality to it.

So here is my W4. Slow Motion – Jane Weaver.

*genuinely, folks, I need some sort of writing course to improve my adjective vocab. Christmas is coming I guess.

Other Ws I thought about were:

The War on Drugs

Wolf Alice

The White Buffalo

What’s your W4?

The Wheel of Your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number. The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album. This week’s spin landed on Q9.

It really wouldn’t be right if I didn’t give this yet another plug! I’ve mentioned this album already several times since its release.  The second time I listened to it I was clearing out and cleaning my kitchen cupboards.  I had a little cry at least twice.  I know a few of you aren’t fans and I understand why.  It’s not a masterpiece, nor a classic but my heart quickens and I feel light-headed listening to parts of it, this song especially produces a strong emotional response.  The longing and yearning it portrays tells a story like any classic literature capturing a tale of love and loss.  I think that’s why I love it so much; to me it feels like the story in a book I would adore.

So, my Q9 track is Villains of Circumstance by Queens of the Stone Age (I’m posting an pared down version as performed on Later with Jools Holland – just because it makes my spine tingle.  The album version is also very lovely).

What’s your Q9?