The Wheel of your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number.  The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album.  This week’s spin landed on T and 12.

The first artist whose name begins with T with a full album in my music collection starting with T is Taj Mahal.  The 12th track on the only album of his I own, which is a compilation called World Music, is Black Jack Davey.  This is a traditional folk song, covered many times by artists such as Bob Dylan and The White Stripes.

What is your T12 track?

Livy Ekemezie, Ebo Taylor and Mulatu Astatke – Discuss

I’ve stumbled upon several artists from African nations over the past few weeks and wanted to share them with you and get your opinions about their music.  In our collection at home we have a few albums by musicians from Africa; they are probably the usual suspects – Fela and Femi Kuti, Bhundu Boys, a couple of great compilations, a band from Ivory Coast called Magic System, which my brother in law bought for me after a trip to see my father in law, who lives in Ghana and one of their songs was constantly on the radio.  The recent death of William Onyeabor introduced me to his music.  Other than that, my shelves are pretty blank when it comes to music from this continent.

From various sources the following three artists came onto my radar.  All different and all fantastic.

Livy Ekemezie – Friday Night.  I know almost nothing about this fella other than he comes from Nigeria and this is a re-release of a long lost EP.  It’s so funky and just makes me want to dance!

Ebo Taylor – Ene Nyame ‘A’ Mensuro.  I know this guy comes from Ghana and this seems to be a remix of a track on an album of his from 1977.  Again really funky.

Mulatu Astatke – Yegelle Tezeta.  An Ethiopian jazz musician.  This track was sampled by Damian Marley and Nas on As We Enter (I think, but happy to be corrected).

Yet again ‘Spillers I come to you to fill in the gaps in my musical knowledge.  What can you tell me about all this and who else should I be tracking down?

Welcome to Wilson Wednesday

Welcome to Wilson Wednesday

No, no, don’t worry, the Spill hasn’t just been sponsored by an international sporting goods manufacturer, nor have we been “cast-away”. (see what I did there???)

Rather, this crazy (and regularly absent) Spill contributor from down under was browsing through his music collection the other day and got to thinking about a large number of musical “Wilsons”. The Marconium already has six solo Wilson artists, probably countless more if we include band members, and that may be the tip of the iceberg.

So, as a semi-regular series, I thought each Wednesday that I get around to it, I will showcase a “Wilson” and open up comment/debate on that Wilson. There are of course obvious Wilsons to explore, and we will, but there will also be some more obscure ones as well. Hey, I will even take requests for Wilsons, and better still, happy for anyone else to provide a write up for Wilson Wednesday – you are all so much more musically knowledgeable than I am.

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The Wheel of Your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number.  The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album.  This week’s spin landed on I and 1

I’m really pleased about this one!  The first album I came to today was In Search Of The Lost Riddim by Ernest Ranglin and track number 1 on that album is the totally gorgeous D’Accord Dakar. Enjoy!

What is your I1 track?

 

Here’s the YouTube playlist of previous suggestions:

American Football – Discuss

I hadn’t intended writing about this band today, but I ran out of time with the thing I did want to write – spreading myself thin again.

American Football is another band I’ve stumbled upon recently.  I was reading Pitchfork, the online music magazine.  There is an amusing article from Feb 2016 about this band; amusing because the writer waxes lyrical about what a shame it is that they are never going to make another album, because their first and only record showed such promise.  I looked them up and was a bit confused to find 2 albums listed – they released their second album two months after the article was written, much to the surprise of the music press it seems.

When I listened to their first album from 1999 I was slightly enchanted.  The music belies the lyrics I think which are so heart-breaking and full of melancholy as they chart the difficulties in a relationship. The guitars are beautiful (I was sort of reminded of mid to late 90s Teenage Fanclub, or is that just me?), there are trumpets in places and the off kilter, swaying melodies are soporific in a calming way; yet the subject matter is quite gloomy in places.   The second album released last year continues with a similar sound and themes.  It’s almost as though they’ve had a lovely peaceful time of it for the past 17 years until something has triggered the need to vomit up and share the emotion again.

But quite honestly, I don’t know what I’m talking about here.  I’m just trying to explain my response to listening to it.  I don’t know enough about this scene or music in general to provide a more informed view I’m afraid (Wiki says it’s Emo – I curled my lips at this, hey, what do I know?), but I’m here to learn.

Yet again ‘Spillers I come to you to fill in the gaps in my musical knowledge.  What can you tell me about all this and who else should I be tracking down?

The Wheel of Your Tune

The Wheel of Your Tune works like this; I metaphorically turn my spinning top to reveal a random letter and number.  The letter relates to an artist or the name of an album in my collection and the number relates to the track by that artist or on that album.  This week’s spin landed on P and 6.

The first album I came to a stop at under P when I flicked through my list of albums was a compilation called Philadelphia Roots: Funk, Soul and the Roots of Disco 1965-73 vol 1.  Track 6 on the first CD is Take It Easy Soul Brother by Corner Boys and Friends.  Enjoy!

What is your P6 track?

 

Here’s the YouTube playlist of previous suggestions for you to add to as well as posting here: